Month: October 2015

Baltimore for the nonsports fan

Operating as the minority in my Courier News, Home News Tribune and Daily Record newsroom, I am not a sports fan. I probably couldn’t name 10 professional athletes, I have never had a proclivity toward a certain team and I’ve been hopelessly bored at every game I have ever been to.

For this reason, my co-workers were confused when I told them that I was taking a weekend trip to Baltimore, which is widely known for its long and storied sporting history.

Was I heading to Camden Yards, they wanted to know? Were the Ravens going to be home? Would I be checking out any sports museums?

All of this talk made me nervous. Would there be enough for a nonsports fan to do in a city where one co-worker drove over four hours there and back in a single day to see an Orioles game?

Luckily for a nonsports fan like me, Baltimore has a lot more to it than a few games.

Baltimore has a lot more to it than a few games – even if those aspects tend to be a little more on the quirky side. (Photo: Jenna Intersimone/Staff Photo)

Baltimore has a lot more to it than a few games – even if those aspects tend to be a little more on the quirky side.
(Photo: Jenna Intersimone/Staff Photo)

Baltimore is a hub of American history, and it is also the site of the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House, which was the home and business place of Mary Pickersgill, who sewed the garrison flag Francis Scott Key witnessed flying over Fort McHenry that inspired him to write our national anthem.

Check out the house, which was built in 1793, from Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and hop on a self-guided tour for $8.

Baltimore is the site of the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House, which was the home and business place of Mary Pickersgill, who sewed the garrison flag Francis Scott Key witnessed flying over Fort McHenry that inspired him to write our national anthem. ~Courtesy of baltimoreheritage.com

Baltimore is the site of the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House, which was the home and business place of Mary Pickersgill, who sewed the garrison flag Francis Scott Key witnessed flying over Fort McHenry that inspired him to write our national anthem. ~Courtesy of baltimoreheritage.com

According to the belief of some, Carminantonio Iannaccone, owner of Baltimore’s Piedigrotta Bakery, is the inventor of tiramisu, making it a must visit for those with a sweet tooth. Iannacone said that while he was living in Treviso, Italy, in 1969, he opened a restaurant, also called Piedigrotta, and created a dessert based on the “everyday flavors of the region” — coffee, mascarpone, eggs, Marsala and ladyfinger cookies.

Piedigrotta, which is open Tuesday through Saturday from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sundays until 6 p.m., started business in 2002 in Baltimore’s Little Italy and remains a popular stopping point for dessert lovers visiting the city.

Chris LaChall/Staff Photographer Piedigrotta, which is open Tuesday through Saturday from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sundays until 6 p.m., started business in 2002. ~File photo

Chris LaChall/Staff Photographer Piedigrotta, which is open Tuesday through Saturday from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sundays until 6 p.m., started business in 2002. ~File photo

If you’re looking to get a taste of the wilderness while still staying in the city, then head to the National Aquariumwhich features a living collection of more than 20,000 fish, birds, amphibians, reptiles and marine mammals living in award-winning habitats, along with periodic talks and shows held throughout the day.

Through October, the Aquarium is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekends, but hours change seasonally. Adult tickets cost about $40 a person and reservations are recommended.

Through October, the Aquarium is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekends. ~File photo

Through October, the Aquarium is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekends. ~File photo

The largest city in Maryland is crazy about Edgar Allan Poe, who called Baltimore home at both the beginning and end of his life. Besides countless restaurants, bars and trinkets adorning the city featuring Poe’s likeness, including Annabel Lee Tavern, which celebrates the author with a kitschy flair, fans can visit his home and museum in the city.

The National Historic Landmark, which is open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the weekends from May 23 through Dec. 27, costs $5 and features a self-guided tour that takes visitors through the celebrated writer’s home. They can also head to his grave site at the Westminster Hall and Burying Ground in the city.

The largest city in Maryland is crazy about Edgar Allan Poe, who called Baltimore home at both the beginning and end of his life. ~File photo

The largest city in Maryland is crazy about Edgar Allan Poe, who called Baltimore home at both the beginning and end of his life. ~File photo

The city districts that cater to tourists, such as the Inner Harbor, Fell’s Point and Little Italy, are very walkable areas, but there is also a much more interesting way to get around — the Baltimore Water Taxi. Even if you’re more than happy to wander, grab an $8 single ride ticket or a $14 all-day pass to travel to 13 stops on the Water Taxi’s trail to get a different view of the surrounding area.

Plus, just as they have been doing for the past 35 years, the Water Taxi employs locals who can give you the insight that you need on what to do, where to stay and where to eat during your visit.

Even if you’re more than happy to wander, grab an $8 single ride ticket or a $14 all-day pass to travel to 13 stops on the Water Taxi’s trail to get a different view of the surrounding area. ~File photo

Even if you’re more than happy to wander, grab an $8 single ride ticket or a $14 all-day pass to travel to 13 stops on the Water Taxi’s trail to get a different view of the surrounding area. ~File photo

Baltimore may be known for its sports, but it’s got a lot more under its baseball cap — including American history, a famous horror author, lots of sea animals, a trip around the Harbor and the world’s first tiramisu.

Give real ghost hunting a try in Princeton

Written for MyCentralJersey.com and DailyRecord.com

Many people don’t think of the charming municipality of Princeton as synonymous with the paranormal. At first, Mimi Omiecinski, owner of Princeton Tour Company for the last nine years, didn’t think so, either.

“A man came on our tour about five years ago who could see ghosts and he said, ‘This is a really haunted town. You ought to get Weird NJ out here and learn about this stuff yourself,’” she said.

However, Omiecinski didn’t want to conduct the types of Halloween tours where teenagers in makeup jump out and scare customers.

“The last thing I wanted to do was commercialize it,” she said. “I didn’t want to go down that route.”

And she didn’t. Instead, Princeton Tour Company’s fall ghost tours bring 25 to 50 visitors on a historically haunted trip through the Princeton University campus and downtown, taking them to about 25 stops on an hour-and-a-half journey over one mile that also brings them to a burial ground where they can use ghost-hunting equipment.

Shelly Hawk, fourth-season tour guide, said, “This is not a jump-out-and-scare-you tour.  This is a different way of bringing the people of Princeton to life and to tell their story. These stories are gruesome because they’re true and they’re much better than putting your hand in wet spaghetti.”

Courtesy of Princeton Tour Company

Courtesy of Princeton Tour Company

Hawk knows that the stories she tells on the tour are true because they’ve been authenticated by the use of ghost-hunting equipment as well as Weird NJ. However, Princeton Tour Company lets guests let guests figure that out for themselves when they hand over the ghost-hunting equipment at an unmarked burial ground that was once host to a skirmish during the Revolutionary War.

At the burial ground, visitors have about 25 minutes to use dowsing rods, therma-meters, EMF meters, electronic voice recorders and cameras to investigate the space, which is the same equipment used for casual paranormal investigations.

“It’s a lot like the TV show ‘Ghost Hunters,’ except that on the show, they are spending a lot of time looking in nooks and crannies. We are spending a lot of time asking questions,” said Omiecinski.

Visitors will say things such as “Can you cross these dowsing rods? I know it takes a lot of energy, but I really want to get to know you,” and other things in a respectful manner that will help ‘wake the dead.’ However, Omiecinski said that once people get the hang of it, they realize they don’t need equipment to feel the presence of spirits.

You also don’t need to completely believe in the paranormal to have a ghostly experience. “Even the nonbelievers love it once you put the rods in their hands,” said Hawk. “They walk away and they look a little more intrigued.”

What they do need, however, is to understand the history of Princeton so they know what to ask the spirits, which is why a good chunk of the ghost tour is spent learning about the history of the legendary municipality.

Courtesy of Princeton Tour Company

Courtesy of Princeton Tour Company

Following the parts of the tour where visitors head to authentically haunted spots and check out the unmarked burial ground with ghost-hunting equipment, they walk to one of America’s oldest cemeteries, owned by the Nassau Presbyterian Church, that contains the graves of people such as John Witherspoon, signer of the Declaration of Independence, Aaron Burr, vice president of the United States and killer of Alexander Hamilton, and President Grover Cleveland, among others.

At the cemetery, guests try out the Princeton Engineering Anomalies Research (PEAR) lamp, which was created by Princeton researchers who studied paranormal activity for two decades, designed to help people develop paranormal capabilities.

The ghost tour visitors attempt to change the lamp’s color by using the power of their minds and energy, similar to a mood ring, which Omiecinski said works over 90 percent of the time.

Although there is no ghost hunting in the cemetery, as it is meant for visitors to learn about the history and be a quiet stroll celebrating Princeton greats, guests do experience peculiar happenings there.

“The cemetery is very serene and powerful and we have a lot of people who walk through unexplained cold spots or get orb shots on their cameras,” said Omiecinski.

Princeton Tour Company urges its guests to bring digital cameras and take a lot of photos in the hopes that they will capture ‘orb shots,’ or the presence of sprits. Often, they do.

Courtesy of Princeton Tour Company

Courtesy of Princeton Tour Company

Although there are no guarantees, Omiecinski said that people who are open to the paranormal often feel paranormal presences on the tour.

“The level of activity is always surprising to me. People will say to me, ‘I found a woman who was 43 years old and had all these children,’ and I ask them, ‘You put all this together?’” said Hawk.

Omiecinski and Hawk aren’t without their own paranormal experiences. Hawk said that while walking from the end of the tour back to her car near the cemetery, she often feels the presence of a girl in turn-of-the-century dress, running along the fence and giggling. When Hawk turns her head to look at her, the girl disappears, so she pretends she doesn’t feel her there.

Despite the hope that the Princeton Tour Company has in discovering paranormal acitivity, Omiecinski said that the best thing to be is a skeptic.

“The whole time it could be because of this or that. We encourage people to assume there isn’t activity but to give the energy of wanting to feel it,” she said.

However, the tour is about a lot more than just the presence of ghosts — it’s also about the history and the storytelling of Princeton.

“People are happy to learn something new,” said Hawk. “This is history being brought to life.”

Courtesy of Princeton Tour Company

Courtesy of Princeton Tour Company

Stormy skies hath no fury on Seneca Lake

As serious weather warnings sent New Jerseyans flocking to their nearest grocery store to stock up on batteries, water and canned goods during the weekend of Oct. 3, I was on a four-hour drive to Seneca Lake to stay in the one place you don’t want to be during a storm — a cabin.

Seneca Lake, the largest of the Finger Lakes in upstate New York, theoretically is a very pleasant place to be as fall sets in on the Northeast. Surrounded by gentle autumn breezes, the passing waves of the lake water and the changing colors of the leaves, Seneca Lake is an ideal place for fall-lovers to kick off the festive season.

Since my camping trip to Seneca Lake was booked months in advance and the weather looked unfortunate yet not tragic, we embarked, with some hesitation, on our planned getaway.

Jenna Intersimone/Staff Photo

Jenna Intersimone/Staff Photo

However, staying in Burdett in a Seneca Secrets cabin, a collection of three rustic yet updated cabins on the east side of the lake for $150 a night, in 40-degree weather with only a wood stove to keep warm, wasn’t the way I envisioned waiting out the storm, which, granted, hit New York a lot less hard than it did New Jersey.

Turns out, though, it wasn’t so bad after all, as Seneca Lake’s attractions need a lot more than a few drops of rain and chilly weather to shut down.

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Obviously, the most practical activity to do on the worst day of weather was to cruise some of the area’s 32 wineries, which make up the Seneca Lake Wine Trail. Each winery is a three-minute drive or less from the next alongside various roads running parallel to Seneca Lake and generally charge $5 to taste about six wines of your choice.

Although the weather didn’t lend itself well to hanging out on many of the wineries’ lush grounds or exploring their vineyards, it did work for relaxing in the tasting rooms, which reflect the personality of the winery. Plus, knowledgeable winery employees enthusiastically share stories and facts about their house-made wines and sometimes host tours of the production facilities.

Most wouldn’t think of a farmer’s market being the go-to place for a rainy day, but luckily, the Windmill Farm and Craft Market, about 25 minutes from Burdett through a relaxing country drive, primarily houses its vendors indoors within four buildings.

Vendors include those that sell baked goods, produce, antiques, home goods, clothing, jewelry and food items to 8,000 to 10,000 people every week, and have been doing so for the past 28 years.

Rain or shine, everyone needs to eat, and a full day of wine tasting and shopping will make any tourist crave a hearty meal. Restaurants and wineries in Seneca Lake love their local goods, and the Stonecat Café, an acclaimed organic regional restaurant nested in Hector, is no exception.

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Open for lunch, brunch and dinner for the past 17 years, the Stonecat Café regularly hosts live music within its homey restaurant, including a jazz band during their weekly Sunday jazz brunches. As the season changes, the menu does as well, making for a truly unique autumn meal at its tables. Before you leave, make sure you check out their herb, flower and vegetable garden in the backyard, which remains bright and buzzing no matter the weather.

Although Watkins Glen State Park, the third-place pick in the USA TODAY Readers’ Choice Poll for Best State Park in the U.S., is best enjoyed in pleasant weather, there was no way that I was missing the 19 waterfalls of the park descended from the 200-foot cliffs along the two-mile gorge trail.

Through the trail, visitors can wander over and under waterfalls and through the cool spray of the Cavern Cascade. In the autumn, the surrounding forest is in full effect, presenting an enviable and colorful backdrop to the flowing waterfalls.

Right around the corner from Watkins Glen State Park is downtown Watkins Glen, which contains a few charming streets of turn-of-the-century homes as well as little shops such as O’Shaughnessy Antiques, a quirky vintage shop with antiques, estate jewelry, vintage designer clothing, vintage books, home furnishings and other odd finds from Louise O’Shaughnessy.

Other shops on the strip include the Fingerlakes Fiber Yarn Store, O Susannah Quilts and Gift, Watkins Glen Sporting Goods, Putty Jug, an antiques dealer, Coins Bought, a coin dealer, Country Haven Treasures, a furniture store, and Village Variety Shop, a used book store.

Seneca Lake, a haven for all things autumn with its changing fall foliage, quiet drives, independently owned wineries and shops and quaint cabins overlooking the lake, is a place best enjoyed in the pleasantry of sunshine. However, a little rain didn’t get in my way of getting my first taste of the season in the Finger Lakes — and since you won’t have a storm blocking your trip, nothing should get in the way of your visit to this haven of fall.

SENECA LAKE ATTRACTIONS

Stay at Seneca Secrets, a collection of three rustic, yet updated cabins located on the east side of the lake in Burdett for $150 a night, which include two rooms, two full-size beds, one bathroom, a kitchen and living room. Visit senecasecrets.com or call 908-922-8518.

Taste wines on the Seneca Lake Wine Trail, which include 32 wineries that are generally located about three minutes from the next. Prices vary per tasting, but usually, wineries charge about $5 to sample six wines of your choice. Visitsenecalakewine.com or call 877-536-2717.

Shop at the Windmill Farm and Craft Market, which has over 200 vendors selling baked goods, produce, antiques, home goods, clothing, jewelry and food items. It is open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. every Saturday until Dec. 12. Visitthewindmill.com or call 315-536-3032.

Hike through Watkins Glen State Park, which features 19 waterfalls descended from 200-foot cliffs along a two-mile gorge trail. Vehicle entrance fee is $8 and park is open year-round. Visit nysparks.com/parks/142 or call 607-535-4511.

Wander through downtown Watkins Glen, which contains a few charming streets of turn-of-the-century homes as well as little shops. Visit watkinsglenchamber.com or call 800-607-4552.

Real-life haunts at Norz Hill’s Scare Farm

Written for MyCentralJersey.com and DailyRecord.com

As Central Jerseyans spend their Halloween season wandering through creepy haunted houses, hay rides and trails, they comfort themselves knowing that the disturbing scenes they witness are simply fiction.

However, Norz Hill Farm of Hillsborough’s “Scare Farm,” which offers a haunted hay ride, “Slay Ride,” as well as two walking trails, ‘Paranoia’ and “Creepy Hollow,” has some true haunted history lurking behind it.

“A lot of people who visit Scare Farm don’t know that two murders happened within 100 yards of one another on the adjoining property,” said Rich Norz, owner of Norz Hill Farm, which has been in the Norz family since 1920.

Although the stories of the murders are slightly wound into Scare Farm’s attractions, they aren’t outright publicized to visitors.

Norz said he and his family and friends come up with the scenes for Scare Farm each year by themselves, brainstorming with one another for the 16- to 20-minute hay ride that ventures through 50 acres, including the barn, a pasture and a corn field as well as the 12- to 15-minute walking trails.

However, the haunted history of the site serves as quite the inspiration.

Photo Courtesy of Norz Hill Farm

Photo Courtesy of Norz Hill Farm

Farmer murdered by greed

Stanley Yankowitz purchased the adjoining property to Norz Hill Farm and former Faukgaowe Indians of New Amsterdam, a sect of the Lenni Lenape Tribe, burial ground site, many years ago.

However he was soon plagued by fires on the land that destroyed his barn and, later, his home. Left homeless on his property, Yankowitz moved into a chicken coop at the farm.

However, word spread that Yankowitz was hiding his money under his mattress in the chicken coop, which led two local farmhands to attempt to find it in 1978. When they were caught in the act by Yankowitz, they beat him to death with a cinder block — and did not find one dollar under the mattress, as it was deposited in a New York City bank the entire time.

The two local farmhands were condemned to the electric chair, a scene that was depicted in Slay Ride’s story in the past, as Norz likes to switch up the haunted hay ride each year.

In this year’s hay ride, the concept of the Indian burial ground is included in the storyline.

Photo Courtesy of Norz Hill Farm

Photo Courtesy of Norz Hill Farm

Crazed farmer turns loved ones into scarecrows

In the early 1800s, the Atrum family purchased the farming property, where they raised their only son, Elias. However, under a strict upbringing, physical abuse and solitary confinement brought about by his father, Elias’s sanity began to slip.

After the sudden deaths of his parents in the mid 1850s, Elias Atrum’s state of mind continued to worsen. Local legend says that he murdered his unfaithful wife and her lover and turned them into scarecrows, and continued to do so, as more scarecrows appeared in the Atrum fields and more locals disappeared.

When the authorities came to the property to investigate, Atrum escaped and was never seen again.

Scare Farm’s haunted walking trail attraction ‘Creepy Hollow’ is based on the story of the murders.

Photo Courtesy of Norz Hill Farm

Photo Courtesy of Norz Hill Farm

A former lover suffers a grisly fate

William Edgar of Branchburg and Leo Orlovsky of West Orange were once in what seemed to be a relationship, but according to Edgar, Orlovsky was “an evil man who forced him into a homosexual relationship and stole his only possessions,” according to Courier News reports.

This led Edgar to stab Orlovsky 32 times with a butcher knife, cut his head off with a hacksaw and throw it into a briar bush, then bury him with his own garden shovel in a shallow grave at the then-deserted farmhouse on Thanksgiving eve of 1985.

Edgar, who admitted to the murder because “he didn’t return my things,” according to Courier News reports, was found innocent by reason of insanity in 1986 and spent the next 10 years in a maximum-security hospital until he died of a heart attack in 1996 at age 47.

Throughout the years, Norz said that he has found several artifacts on his land being that the property is an Indian burial ground, as there were formerly several encampments on the south branch of the Raritan River.

However, has Norz ever experienced any real-life haunts on the property which has housed so many gruesome occurrences? “You never know,” he said.

Photo Courtesy of Norz Hill Farm

Photo Courtesy of Norz Hill Farm

Scare Farm at Norz Hill Farm

Where: 116 South Branch Road, Hillsborough

When: Fridays and Saturdays from 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. from Sept. 25 to Oct. 31, Sundays from Oct. 11 to Oct. 25 from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Cost: Any one attraction is $14, any two attractions are $24 and any three attractions are $30

Tickets: No advance ticket sales (first-come, first-served and no refunds)

Age: Not recommended for those under 13, children under 13 not permitted without an adult

Fall into fall at New Hope with 7 activities

By the time October rolls around, many of us have exhausted our vacation days after summertime trips and setting up holiday getaways.

Luckily for New Jerseyans, we already live in an autumn wonderland, so there isn’t much need to wander far.

Right around the corner from Central Jersey is New Hope, Pennsylvania, a quaint, historic and charming borough full of antique shops, boutiques and fine restaurants and bars, surrounded by a woodsy quiet and separated from our state by only the Delaware River.

In autumn, New Hope becomes a haven for falling leaves, sweeping breezes and, of course, seasonal and haunted activities — all just a short drive from home. If you plan to make your way across the river for just the day or the whole weekend, don’t miss these stopping points in New Hope.

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1. Shop the streets

New Hope is home to some seriously eccentric shops, making it quite the stopping point for those looking to pick up something different. Visitors should wander River Road, Ferry Street and Bridge Street, some of the most scenic and historic streets, which feature the largest concentration of interesting stores.

Some of the shops that travelers shouldn’t pass up are Farley’s Bookshop, which offers a diverse collection of books young and old, Love Saves the Day, a vintage shop that holds collections of nostalgic clothes, toys and trinkets, and Suzies Hot Shoppe, which has enough hot sauce to have you running next door to Fran’s Pub for a cold drink. However, the best way to find the coolest shops in New Hope is to simply take a walk down the street.

2. Get spooked on ghost tour

New Hope is a decidedly historic and, thus, as some believe, haunted borough, which makes it an ideal place to get scared as October sneaks up on us with a ghost tour.

By meeting at Main and Ferry Streets in New Hope at 8 p.m. any Friday or Saturday night in October (including Halloween) through the third week of November, you can follow a lantern-led walk and learn about the phantom hitchhiker of the New Hope, a historic inn where Aaron Burr periodically appears and other happenings. To find out more, visit ghosttoursofnewhope.com or call 215-343-5564.

For $10, thirsty travelers can taste five wines from the wine list and pick up a New Hope Winery etched glass from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. everyday. ~Courtesy of winetrailadventures.com

For $10, thirsty travelers can taste five wines from the wine list and pick up a New Hope Winery etched glass from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. everyday. ~Courtesy of winetrailadventures.com

3. Grab taste of borough at New Hope Winery

With a mix of wines ranging from light, fruity whites to sophisticated reds, those stopping in New Hope can try a sampling of the winery’s offerings by visiting the rustic 18th-century barn located between New Hope and Peddler’s Village in Flemington.

For $10, thirsty travelers can taste five wines from the wine list and pick up a New Hope Winery etched glass from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. every day. Find more information by visiting newhopewinery.com or calling 215-794-2331.

4. Stay at Logan Inn B&B

As visitors enter New Hope, they will feel like they are taking a step back in time — and where they stay for the night should reflect that, too. Established in 1727 as an inn, The Logan Inn is one of the borough’s historic lodgings and features 16 individually decorated rooms that combine Colonial style and modern luxuries.

Located on West Ferry Street, the Inn has views of busy Main and Ferry streets and offers double to king beds. Plan your stay by visiting loganinn.com or calling 215-862-2300.

Established in 1727 as an inn, The Logan Inn is one of the borough’s historic lodgings, which features 16 individually decorated rooms that combine colonial spirits and modern luxuries. ~Courtesy of phillymag.com

Established in 1727 as an inn, The Logan Inn is one of the borough’s historic lodgings, which features 16 individually decorated rooms that combine colonial spirits and modern luxuries. ~Courtesy of phillymag.com

5. Shop 100-year-old shopping center Rice’s Market

With its various boutiques and specialty stores, New Hope was made for savvy shoppers. To get a taste of the shopping that New Hope has to offer without having to trudge along the streets, check out Rice’s Market, a 100-year-old 30-acre outdoor shopping market that typically houses over 400 vendors and 8,000 shoppers in a single day.

Vendors offer products such as antiques and collectibles, Amish meats and baked goods, fresh fruits and vegetables, jewelry, clothing and handbags. The oldest and largest outdoor market in Bucks County is open Tuesdays and Saturdays from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. from March until December. Find more information at ricesmarket.com or call 215-297-5993.

6. Take stroll through Washington Crossing Historic Park

Surrounded by gently falling leaves and the Delaware River, there is no better way to enjoy a fall day outdoors than with a bike ride or walk through Washington Crossing Historic Park. Those with an outdoorsy spirit can wander the Delaware Canal Towpath from the park, which extends from Bristol to Easton and is the only continuous intact canal remaining from the historic canal-building era of the early and mid-1800s.

Also, don’t miss Bowman’s Hill Tower at the Park, which provides a 14-mile view of the Bucks County and Hunterdon County Valley along the Delaware River. Plan your visit by going to washingtoncrossingpark.org or calling 215-493-4076.

Bowman's Hill Tower at the Park provides a 14-mile view of the Bucks County and Hunterdon County Valley along the Delaware River. ~Courtesy of Washington Crossing Historic Park Fullscreen By meeting at Main and Ferry Streets in New Hope atEstablished in 1727 as an inn, The Logan Inn is one Located on West Ferry Street, the Inn has views of Bowman's Hill Tower at the Park provides a 14-mile Those with an outdoorsy spirit can wander the Delaware For $10, thirsty travelers can taste five wines from With a mix of wines ranging from light, fruity whites If you’re strolling through downtown New Hope, stop The brewing company, which also has a location in Princeton, Love Saves the Day is a vintage shop that holds collections Farley’s Bookshop offers a diverse collection of books Last SlideNext Slide

Bowman’s Hill Tower at the Park provides a 14-mile view of the Bucks County and Hunterdon County Valley along the Delaware River. ~Courtesy of Washington Crossing Historic Park
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By meeting at Main and Ferry Streets in New Hope at Established in 1727 as an inn, The Logan Inn is one Located on West Ferry Street, the Inn has views of Bowman’s Hill Tower at the Park provides a 14-mile Those with an outdoorsy spirit can wander the Delaware For $10, thirsty travelers can taste five wines from With a mix of wines ranging from light, fruity whites If you’re strolling through downtown New Hope, stop The brewing company, which also has a location in Princeton, Love Saves the Day is a vintage shop that holds collections Farley’s Bookshop offers a diverse collection of books
Last SlideNext Slide

7. Grab a flight at Triumph Brewing Co.

If you’re strolling through downtown New Hope, stop by the Triumph Brewing Company, which features its own craft beers alongside local and seasonal entrees. The brewing company, which also has a location in Princeton, often features live music on weekends.

The large outdoor patio is a great place to hang out to get that autumn breeze, or stay warm inside on the restaurant floor or by the bar. Get more information attriumphbrewing.com or call 215-862-8300, or visit from 11:30 a.m. Monday through Saturday or after noon on Sundays.

For those looking for a seasonal destination that doesn’t need indoor pools or hot weather to prove its tourist appeal, head to New Hope to get a taste of what fall is all about.